PsychoCircus

Is a project based on fabricating an enclosed box in the shape of a theatre which will consist of psychedelic and illusions elements.

The Box will be made out of wood and then painted in hippie, psychedelic colors. On the front there will be a big circular 3D printed circle which will consist of illusion patterns in the colors of black and white made out of acrylic. The circle will be mounted on to a motor that will continuously spin it. There will be a potentiometer attached in order to adjust the speed of the motor and thus the illusion circle. Next to the main circle on both sides there will be smaller circles that will be connected through gears and will as well turn simultaneously. On top of the box, a sign, carved in the lasercutter will read PsychoCircus and it will be painted accordingly to the theme. Lastly there will be a switch to turn on/off the motor. Everything is going to be controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.

  1. Designing the layout of the front view on illustrator:

2) Prototyping with Cardboard:

3) Testing to see how the gears will fall in place and how they will react.

4) Fabricating the enclosure for the spinning wheels.

5) Fabricating the spinning wheels made from acrylic and orienting them       in order to match up.

6) LaserCut “Psychocircus” lettering and assemble gears and spinning            wheels. Making sure to spray paint all wooden parts black.


 

Directing VR

Photo Roman:

WEEKEND

Cut of another students’ 1 minute of footage:

MISSING

“Recreate a Scene”:

UBER DRIVER

Tiltbrush experiment:

VR FINAL PROJECT

Presentation with Ashley:

VR SOUND

The presentation can be found on the below link:

http://prezi.com/o-crlh__dpy4/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

https://www.jauntvr.com/title/49b325c60e

Final Project:

Below is a presentation and first idea of the final project:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1rCrk7sidwQwrlWICs_ZydaCuHoAqYBzT6v6niFIL75Q/edit#slide=id.g1b339fe412_0_732

Script:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vdKpsv7Y1N0HOjYqTD7bbUTo0FSUTg9Rms2ql2Y6xdc/edit

 

 

PuzzleSphere

For our puzzle assignment Sejo and I teamed up and came up with the idea of making a “PuzzleSphere”. The concept is to create several puzzle pieces shaped into different interlocking styles and then have each one of them connect to their corresponding puzzle piece/pieces, while all of the assembly will take place inside a sphere. The correct order in which the pieces will interlock to one another is essential.

We tried to prototype early with some cardboard and see how the pieces will behave to one another, while also test different ways of interlocking.

Some of the pieces and their shapes we used are seen below:

We then tried to assemble each puzzle piece to their corresponding piece/pieces:


The rough idea of what we want to create can be seen by the 3D model created on Rhino. It doesn’t reflect the actual puzzles pieces seen here yet but its our first approach to developing the PuzzleSphere.

How the Pieces (Wood-Lasercut) and Sphere (3D Printed) came out + assembly + end result:


 

 

 

Solar Powered Charging Station

For my final project I would like to engage in a solar powered charging station that could provide an output of a usb slot made for devices to power up.

The initial idea is to be able to have a solar panel that could automatically position it self according to where the sun is facing at any given moment. Its rotation should be done on the Y-axis as well as the X-axis.

What will be needed at a first glance:

– Arduino Uno
– Solar panel
– Servo
– Light Detecting Resistors
– Wooden/Acrylic Box (Laser Cut)
– USB output

The first step was to determine its part that its going to be used individually in order to see if everything works as it should:

Some testing with the servo motor:

Some testing with the Light Detecting Sensors:

Combining the Servo with the Light Detecting Sensors:

Having successfully operated the sensors with the servos the next step is to start building the enclosure for the Arduino and the electrical components as well as the structure for the panel and servos to operate:

The initial testing is being done with cardboard in order to ensure that everything can work proportionally and mechanically correct before proceeding to wood and acrylic.

The next step is to finalize the design and make sure that everything fits together properly.

Lasercutting the necessary pieces to form the structure of the solar panel:

Checking various pieces to see how they fit together:

Testing for Voltage and Amps:

The problem is that the battery produced around 2V which is not enough to power the Arduino board and run it. The o.43 Amps that the motors and sensors with the Arduino produced where a positive sign.

Finally some testing was done to see how the sensors reacted to the light and how they could accurately track it. There is difference in the behavior of the sensors when there is more light around them rather than having them in a darker room with direct light focusing on the sensors only.

 

Draw Your Self in a Movie Poster Robot

Our group has had an incredible journey piecing together our robot together over the last 6 weeks. After building the CNC machine from scratch, we had to develop an idea that changed the nature of the CNC and used it in a completely new way than what was intended by it’s creators.
Concept: Create a robot that take a picture of the user, and then draw that user’s face as a character on a movie poster.

Our team had various design challenges we had to overcome. Some of the considerations we had to think about included:

  • Designing a method by which to hold a writing utensil. This is important as we needed the unit to flex just enough to provide a natural artistic stroke to the robotic gantry.
  • Designing the CNC bed to provide ample support, pressure and texture to the pen from above.
  • Determining the proper writing utensil
  • Converting an image from it’s original format to SVG, making it Black and White, then editing it so that the image is only composed of outlines.
  • Making sure the camera recognizes the user’s face
  • Determining where to place the cropped and converted image of a user’s face into the appropriate area on the movie poster

Method to Hold the Pen

We experimented with various types of ways to hold the pen using the original router holder. We ended up designing our own plate and 3D printing our pen holders for maximum flexibility and precision.

Designing the CNC Bed

We wanted to provide the proper surface for the pen to write on the bed. We created a bed out of acrylic, to make sure that the holes were covered. We then placed a thin sheet of foam and thicker poster paper on top to provide a firm, cushy and smooth surface to put paper on so the pen would easily glide while drawing.

 

Deciding the Proper Writing Utensil

We tested with various types of pens and markers. The way our machine is set up, it made the marker lines way too thick, so we opted to go with a ball-point pen, as it easily glides along the paper.

 

 

Computer Vision, Image Conversion and Process Flow

Our process flow is the following:

 

Select movie poster. Title it ‘poster.jpg’

Take image of user

 

Python script detects the user face on the movie posters

Select the face you want to swap with and swap faces

 

Convert File to Black and White & SVG

Progress:

1) Refine and stabilize the pen plotter so that the pen is more secure

2) Draw a complex image and figure out file convesions from PNG to SVG

3) Experiment with various pens/markers
One thing we were impressed by was the level of precisions of the pen. Below you can see how precise fhe pen is.

We were impressed by the level of precision by the pen. If you can see below, the lines are incredily close together. We chose the dog image for it’s relative simplicity and then the following image of the girl to see if we could draw something thatbhad a few layers in the outline. The girl image took roughly 15-20 minutes to complete, so we can expect the movie poster to take that long.

We need to figure out if we can use the Gcode to speed upthe drawing process.

​​​

We got our robot drawing! We had to mess around with the wiring a bit, but we now have the robot drawing.

​​The Pen Plotter

We 3D printed the pen holder with 2 holes for the screw mounts.


As we tested this layout, it was way to flimsy. It kept turning and becoming misaligned.



We then decided to create a backplate to prevent the twisiting and turned due to the ACME screw. This is to make sure the pen is stable enough for drawing.

We took the measurements from the steel plate and laser cut a new one with various holes for adjustment purposes. This set up works ideally for what we want to do.


Surface

We also lser cut a board that matched up with the screw holes on the base. This was to make sure that the surface was completely flat for drawing. 4 out of 6 of our holes were off, but that does not affect the positioning of the base plate as it’s held in place pretty firmly.

RESULTS:

Some of the successful attempts from our Robot as well as some attempts to transfer a self portrait into a movie poster and then into an Svg file for the CNC machine to draw:

Solar Energy Project

For our solar energy project (teamed up with Jesal) we chose to work on a solar powered watering plant system. The idea is to have two sensors plugged into the soil to keep track of how often the plant needs watering based on the parameters we are going to agree on. Once the plant needs watering, a water pump will then be triggered and the water could transfer to allow irrigation.

We firstly tried to allocate all the resources that we are going to need for the project as listed below:

Materials Needed

  • An enclosure (1)
  • PC Board (1)
  • 5VDC SPDT micro relay (1) **
  • Solar Panel (1)
  • Lithium-Ion Battery (1)
  • Toggle switch (1)
  • 10K resistor (1)
  • Size M coaxial DC power plug
  • Red and black 22AWG wire
  • 12AWG black wire
  • Electric water pump (1)
  • Water storage container w/ lid (1)
  • 8-32 x 2.5″ nuts and bolts (2)
  • 4-40 x 1″ nuts and bolts (8)
  • 4-40 x 3/8″ nut and bolt (1)
  • 1/4″ spacers (4)
  • Wire nut (1)
  • 3′ – 5′ plastic tubing (2)
  • #8 Terminal Ring (1)
  • House plant to water (1)

 

Making Our Own Water Pump

We then went on trying to make our own water pump. We had to improvise and so we found a canister for pills which could store the 3.7V motor inside as well as the 3D printed water turbine. Then we laser-cut an enclosing for the top part of the motor which will then be sealed with glue so that no water can intrude the wiring.

We tested the motor with a minimum voltage of 2.3 to see how well it can spin and the results where more than satisfying.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8xp4OZYJXQ&feature=youtu.be

This did not work as the enclosure did not provide enough suction for the water to be drawn in from our reservoir. We then bought a small water pump from Tinkersphere.

 

Battery

We used a 3.7V 650mAh battery that was able to produce the power we needed to power the water pump long enough for the water to be drawn into the plant’s soil.

 Sensors

​​​​

Code

This is the code we used for the Arduino. It was inspired by Randolfo’s version of the code.

 

// Analog input pin that the soil moisture sensor is attached to
const int analogInPin = A1;

// value read from the soil moisture sensor
int sensorValue = 0;

// if the readings from the soil sensor drop below this number, then turn on the pump
int dryValue = 700

void setup() {

pinMode(12, OUTPUT);

// initialize serial communications at 9600 bps:
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
// read the analog in value:
sensorValue = analogRead(analogInPin);

//Turns on the water pump if the soil is too dry
//Increasing the delay will increase the amount of water pumped
if(sensorValue < dryValue){
digitalWrite(12, HIGH);
delay(10000);
digitalWrite(12, LOW);
}

// print the sensor to the serial monitor:
Serial.print(“sensor = ” );
Serial.println(sensorValue);

//slow your roll – I mean… slow down the code a little
delay(100);
}

Finally, being able to make the pump work with the sensor and code all together we were able to demonstrate how the system worked on an actual plant as seen below:

 

kinetic Energy Project

For our kinetic energy project (teamed up with Dorothy), we chose to make a faucet enabled water turbine, that when successfully operated from the force of the water, could generate enough power through a 3.7 V motor attached, to light a whole strip of LEDs.

Below is some of the documentation regarding experimentation, prototyping and finally execution (at least tried to):

We made some readings to determine the voltage that the motor could generate and if it was sustainable for the overall of the project:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10bEnPTJgt4&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0qr3gbaNmA&feature=youtu.be

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0a88RDxAjo&feature=youtu.be

Once the design was finished and we knew how we wanted to proceed with the actual fabrication, we 3D printed a water turbine and laser-cut some acrylic enclosures. We then fitted the gears and the motor (taken from an old VHS player).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0jP73GBAtg&feature=youtu.be

 

 

Mechanisms

Figuring out how to make gears and have them move objects can be fascinating. Below is a first rough sketch of what I’m trying to experiment with, in order to come to a point where gears will be able to move objects in a forward motion:

The first stage of the project will consist of the proper fabrication of gears. I’m envisioning having gears made out of wood. The diameter would vary from gear to gear but the ratio of teeth to diameter will stay the same throughout. Furthermore, some testing will begin for to see if the gears can produce efficient power and smoothness in relevance to each other. For each successful gear configuration, I will make the correspondent holes to the sides of the enclosure (Gears will be inside a acrylic box).

The second stage will consist of the actual pieces that are going to be mounted on to the gears and moved along in a forward motion. I will have to make sure that each gear would have a different effect on each of the pieces, meaning some should move slower and some faster.

After some testing to see how the rods will stick out of the box:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVTO1a4M1J8&feature=youtu.be

The end result looks like this:


Non-Rectangular Box

Our point of view in creating a non-rectangular box was to go with the idea of a round-like box.

We started with some very rough sketches of what our idea should look like:

We thought of having half-pie pieces with numerous slots on them in order to be able to slide in the disks that were going to be holding the main structure. These disks would have a hole in the center for the “vase” to serve as a holding compartment.

Moving on we did some experimentation with some cardboard to understand if the logic behind was going to serve our purpose:

Convinced that the design can be executed we went on to design the actual pieces onto illustrator. We again experimented with cardboard, but this time we had the laser cutter do the job for us:

And getting to the end of it, since the pieces proved to be really accurate and applicable for assembly we put our piece of wood into the laser cutter again for curving. We assembled all the pieces together using hot glue.

 

The end result looks like this:

Drinkbot

Verb — Drinkbot

A machine that will be able to produce your desired cocktail or drink based on predetermined options to choose from.

The machine will be operating on a traditional X,Y,Z gantry. It will have two components mounted on the railings:

1. Circular Rotational Plate: It can hold up to 7 bottles. Bottles will be filled with your desire drink and mixer first. Refill when needed. Once the desired drink is chosen, the machine will start pouring the necessary portions. Also attached to the plate will be a mixing “spoon”. Once all the pouring has been done the machine will stir the drink.

2. Ice Bucket: It will be fixed on the right side of the machine’s top railings, making sure the glass gets the appropriate amount of ice based on the selection of either a short glass or tall glass. It will be designed with a slight downwards angle so for the ice to be always reaching the output hole.

3. Glass Holder: It can hold up to 4 glasses per use. Glasses once placed on the holder will trigger a sensor which will determine the position of each glass so the pouring can be done correctly.

4. Controller: It will give you the following options to chose from: Cocktail list, make your own drink (based on the drinks and mixers filled in), random cocktail.

Enjoy!

 

I feel more confident in the following areas:  Concept generation, fabrication and not so confident on: Programming, Electronics